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Many odd designs have appeared briefly on the compound bow scene over the years, and faded out again. First introduced in 1982, one that has survived the evolutionary test was designed by an American, John Islas. The appearance of the bow is bizarre, and the action grotesque: as it is being drawn, the limbs appear to be breaking apart: but the archer experiences (to his astonishment) a smooth and recoil-free shot. The bow is the 'Oneida Eagle', made by Oneida Labs, of New York State.

Oneida Eagle

The cast of the bow is excellent, comparable with that of the best compounds: but how is it achieved?
At either end of the weapon is a short recurved bow limb, with a string attached to each nock, and in the centre is a handle riser; but there ends the similarity with a normal bow. If carrying such a bow into the headquarters of the Royal Toxophilite Society, the working parts (as on certain Classical statues) should be discreetly veiled! But we live in permissive times, so, with a warning that the explicit description hereunder may offend some readers, here is the secret of the 'Oneida Eagle'...
Between handle riser and bow limb is a short, solid fibreglass spring, which exerts a powerful leverage on the heel of the bow limb... Now, where have we heard a similar description before?


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